Output prediction values in excel file

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Output prediction values in excel file

asadbtk
Hello, I want to import all the values of prediction (predicted, actual and error) into the excel file so that I can perform statistical analysis. I have checked both in the format of CSV and plain text but I could not paste it in excel in proper format. Sometimes in one cell of excel, more than one value is pasted and sometimes other types of format. 

Can I directly import it into excel or copy paste the values in a format so that we can then find its mean/median etc?

Best regards

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Re: Output prediction values in excel file

Peter Reutemann-3
On July 19, 2020 8:30:25 AM GMT+12:00, javed khan <[hidden email]> wrote:

>Hello, I want to import all the values of prediction (predicted, actual
>and
>error) into the excel file so that I can perform statistical analysis.
>I
>have checked both in the format of CSV and plain text but I could not
>paste
>it in excel in proper format. Sometimes in one cell of excel, more than
>one
>value is pasted and sometimes other types of format.
>
>Can I directly import it into excel or copy paste the values in a
>format so
>that we can then find its mean/median etc?
>
>Best regards

If you're talking about the output in the Explorer, you should select CSV as output (more options) and also specify the file to save the output in. Then just load that CSV file in your spreadsheet application.
Excel has never been great with CSV files, as it tries automatically to determine the format of the file and quite often fails at guessing it correctly. LibreOffice's Calc, on the other hand, always prompts you with an import dialog that gives you fine grained control over the format.

The Weka Investigator in ADAMS can display the predictions as a proper table supporting sorting/searching (you specify what outputs you want to display in separate tabs) and allows you to save them in various spreadsheet formats, including native Excel formats.

Cheers, Peter
--
Peter Reutemann
Dept. of Computer Science
University of Waikato, NZ
+64 (7) 858-5174
http://www.cms.waikato.ac.nz/~fracpete/
http://www.data-mining.co.nz/
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Re: Output prediction values in excel file

asadbtk
Thank you Peter for your instant reply. Yes, you are right, excel is not as robust with excel files.

For the time being, I just made the option "use tab" True and now I can copy and paste the values.

Best regards

On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 11:05 PM Peter Reutemann <[hidden email]> wrote:
On July 19, 2020 8:30:25 AM GMT+12:00, javed khan <[hidden email]> wrote:
>Hello, I want to import all the values of prediction (predicted, actual
>and
>error) into the excel file so that I can perform statistical analysis.
>I
>have checked both in the format of CSV and plain text but I could not
>paste
>it in excel in proper format. Sometimes in one cell of excel, more than
>one
>value is pasted and sometimes other types of format.
>
>Can I directly import it into excel or copy paste the values in a
>format so
>that we can then find its mean/median etc?
>
>Best regards

If you're talking about the output in the Explorer, you should select CSV as output (more options) and also specify the file to save the output in. Then just load that CSV file in your spreadsheet application.
Excel has never been great with CSV files, as it tries automatically to determine the format of the file and quite often fails at guessing it correctly. LibreOffice's Calc, on the other hand, always prompts you with an import dialog that gives you fine grained control over the format.

The Weka Investigator in ADAMS can display the predictions as a proper table supporting sorting/searching (you specify what outputs you want to display in separate tabs) and allows you to save them in various spreadsheet formats, including native Excel formats.

Cheers, Peter
--
Peter Reutemann
Dept. of Computer Science
University of Waikato, NZ
+64 (7) 858-5174
http://www.cms.waikato.ac.nz/~fracpete/
http://www.data-mining.co.nz/
_______________________________________________
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